July 31, 2007—Conversation, Compromise, and Consensus

Reasonable people can disagree, but to those who do no more than criticize, by letters, innuendo, or speechifying, I say that you dishonor our town and imperil effective government by reducing a potentially large pool of bright, talented, responsible, civic-minded citizens to a very small group of dedicated individuals with necessarily thick skins.

In the course of my campaign to be elected Woodstock’s next Town Supervisor, I’ve enjoyed the opportunity to listen to the concerns and aspirations of many of our fellow Woodstockers. The Town has issues, certainly, but I believe that through conversation, compromise, and consensus, we can resolve these issues in ways that will prove to be win-win for all concerned.

We can pull together as a town—and I believe that effective leadership can help us in this regard—to achieve stable taxation on the Town level and better value for our school taxes. We can achieve greater cell coverage for the Town in its western districts, together with broadband communication services. We can work with Central Hudson to reduce the power outages chronic in some areas.

Together, we can work to restore the employment base lost by the departure of Simulaids from Bearsville. I believe we can also finally bring closure to the Town’s 20-year effort to have buried oil tanks removed from the various private properties in which they lie. Through intelligent planning, I am optimistic that we can maintain our town’s rural character and native beauty, manage our problems with traffic and parking, and repair our sidewalks.

I am confident that we can find appropriate ways to keep our seniors integrated within our community and to provide our youth with enhanced opportunities in recreation, education, and employment. We can include affordable housing components while protecting Woodstock from becoming a Town solely for the wealthy and the tourists. We can upgrade our facilities and optimize our public spaces. By tempering creativity and opportunism with careful research and intelligent approaches, we may well be able to achieve Woodstock’s stated goal of carbon-neutrality within ten years.

There is much for us to accomplish, and it is Woodstock’s appointed and elected officials who move this process forward. I thank all who offer to serve in these positions or stand for election. Reasonable people can disagree, but to those who do no more than criticize, by letters, innuendo, or speechifying, I say that you dishonor our town and imperil effective government by reducing a potentially large pool of bright, talented, responsible, civic-minded citizens to a very small group of dedicated individuals with necessarily thick skins. Vote at every opportunity and volunteer to serve.


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